Thursday, May 5, 2016

Figuartive language

In the story Lord Of The Flies there are many instances of figurative language that Golding masterfully crafts for the readers enjoyment. One instance of figurative language is right at the start of the novel. "The incredible pool was only invaded by the sea at high tide." This single sentence clearly paints an image of a beautiful lagoon, so pristine and untouched. Only to be hidden at high tide. The figurative language used is clearly personification, or the act of giving human characteristics to a nonhuman object or animal. Tough this is only one example, throughout the novel Golding continues to use figurative language to enhance the reading experience of Lord of the Flies.

Thursday, April 28, 2016

The Stanford Prison Experiment and LOTF

When people are placed in a hostile environment what happens to them. After reading LOTF and watching the Stanford Prison Experiment it turns out that people become unlike themselves. Doing things that are way out of character and even show hostility towards their peers. In LOTF the boys go on to brutally kill Simon because of the islands effect on their minds. They become less like individuals and more like savages. The same goes for the Stanford Prison Experiment. The experiment was supposed to be peaceful but instead it quickly got out of hand, escalating to hostile behavior to each other. The experiment went so far south that instead of the two weeks the experiment was supposed to take, the experiment was cut short to only six days. Situations like these never bring out the good, but instead bring out the beast in all of them.

Thursday, April 14, 2016

Mob Mentality in LOTF

There are many examples of mob mentality in LOTF. One example in the novel is in chapter nine, when Simon kicks the bucket with the help of his so called friends. IN chapter nine Ralph and company is invited to a feast hosted by Jack and his new tribe. When things get a little wild people stop thinking as individuals but as a mob, and that's exactly what happens at the feast. Poor Simon has just come from the jungle only to be mistaken for the beast. The group, not thinking straight brutally attacks Simon, killing him.

Thursday, February 25, 2016

Can you teach empathy?

Is empathy teachable? In my opinion yes. Just think about it. When you were a baby where you all concerned about other's feelings. No you weren't, as a matter of fact when I was a baby I was a complete buttnugget. I was a fat blob that just ate, slept and crapped himself. When you took a massive dookie in your pants were you concerned about your parents feelings, no you weren't. But as you grew up, you grew to accept others feelings. You grew to understand those around you and to be friendly to your peers.
When you go to school you grow friendships with those you can relate to. You start to empathize with more people as they do to you. To learn empathy is like to learn how to walk, everyone is capable of it. Empathy is taught by experience through life, not by any one person.
When you are born you have yet to learn empathy, but as you expose yourself to the real world the world itself will teach you to feel and understand others.

Thursday, January 28, 2016

Who lives in a pineapple but is slower than me?


Shows today contain characters with multitudes of personalities, and a new trend that occurs in shows include those with disabilities. Whether they are positive or not representations can be argued. But one mentally disabled character stands out to me is a character on the great tv show Spongebob Squarepants. A character by the name of Patrick J. Star. This character is your average slower than usual character. When i mean slow i mean slow. The character himself is obviously an exaggeration of a mentally disabled character. Patrick is well known to be rather stupid, yet through his stupidity he is one of the most loved characters. I personally owe most of my childhood laughter to the guy after all, he’s hilarious. But does his character portray mentally disabled positively. Well both sides could be taken, some might say the over exaggeration of the character is disrespectful to the disabled. But in my professional judgement I believe this is a positive representation. Never in my childhood did I ever look at Patrick in a disabled way. I saw him as one of the happiest guy in all television. Just because he’s different doesn’t mean he can’t be a regular happy guy. Patrick’s personality is one of the biggest reasons I love him, and a reason I wouldn’t change anything about him.